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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Villagization and agricultural production in Ethiopia found in the catalog.

Villagization and agricultural production in Ethiopia

Alemayehu Lirenso.

Villagization and agricultural production in Ethiopia

a case study of Shewa region

by Alemayehu Lirenso.

  • 82 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [Addis Ababa .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Ethiopia,
  • Shewa.
    • Subjects:
    • Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Ethiopia -- Shewa.,
    • Villages -- Ethiopia -- Shewa.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Alemayehu Lirenso.
      ContributionsWinrock International Institute for Agricultural Development.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD2124.5.Z9 S532 1988
      The Physical Object
      Pagination72 p. :
      Number of Pages72
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1848517M
      LC Control Number89981871

        During the dark days of the famine, Ethiopia made plans to relocate virtually its entire rural population - somewhere between 33 and 37 million people - by the s. As part of the Dergue's year development plan, these relocations are labeled as two distinct but related programs: resettlement and villagization. Together they constitute one of the . Villagization aimed to radically transform rural life in Ethiopia while combatting drought and increasing agricultural productivity. The Mengistu regime saw villagization as a way to quickly achieve the collectivization of agriculture and rural modernization.

      Villagization and Agricultural Production in Ethiopia, Research Report Addis Ababa: Institute of Development Research, Addis Ababa University. Clapham, C. Cited by: Resettlement and villagization in Ethiopia has been an issue from the late nineteenth century up to the present, due to the overcrowded population of the Ethiopian highlands. As the population of Ethiopia has increased in the twentieth century, the need to move inhabitants has only increased as available cropland per family declined to its current level of less than one hectare per farmer.

      Four dissimilar cases of agricultural mechanization in different regions of Ethiopia are described and analyzed for potential benefits, costs, and compatability with certain objectives selected from the Ethiopian Third Five-Year Plan. The broad definition of mechanization is employed: any form of mechanical assistance used in agricultural technology, facilitates consideration of any. Agriculture in Ethiopia explained. Agriculture in Ethiopia is the foundation of the country's economy, accounting for half of gross domestic product (GDP), % of exports, and 80% of total employment.. Ethiopia's agriculture is plagued by periodic drought, soil degradation caused by overgrazing, deforestation, high levels of taxation and poor infrastructure (making it difficult .


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Villagization and agricultural production in Ethiopia by Alemayehu Lirenso. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Nuer Pastoralists - Between Large Scale Agriculture and Villagization: A case study of the Lare District in the Gambella Region of Ethiopia (Current African Issues) Paperback – Septem : Wondwosen Michago Seide.

Lessons from Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Tanzania Oxfam-GB Dr. Christy Cannon Lorgen January 1. Introduction This report evaluates the process of villagisation in Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Tanzania and draws out issues from the experience of these three countries that are relevant to Rwanda orFile Size: KB.

Book Description: The perception of Ethiopia projected in the media is often one of chronic poverty and hunger, but this bleak assessment does not accurately reflect most of the country today.

Ethiopia encompasses a wide variety of agroecologies and peoples. Its agriculture sector, economy, and food security status are equally complex. Ethiopia has a long and brutal history of failed attempts at resettling millions of people in collectivized villages, particularly under the.

In general terms, agricultural investment in Ethiopia is focused on the regions of Benishangul-Gumuz, Gambella, Afar and Somali—the same regions where villagization programs are.

Access to land in Ethiopia The impact of land laws, industrial development, villagization and land-grab in rural areas Abstract The objective of this thesis is to examine rural populations' access to land in Ethiopia, in the light of land regulations and different obstacles.

Using a qualitative research design, based on a literature. Agricultural Extension in Ethiopia: The Case of Participatory Demonstration and Training Extension System Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Author: Kassa Belay.

Livestock Production and Marketing terms of quality and quantity), effective value chain coordination and develop- ment, reliable input and service provision, and improvement in policies. Agriculture in Ethiopia is the foundation of the country's economy, accounting for half of gross domestic product (GDP), % of exports, and 80% of total employment.

Ethiopia 's agriculture is plagued by periodic drought, soil degradation [1] caused by overgrazing, deforestation, high levels of taxation and poor infrastructure (making it difficult and expensive. Villagization has been officially promoted to encourage diversification from livestock herding to agricultural cultivation, and to fulfil basic needs through infrastructure and services.

From the late s, villagization was reintroduced for arid and semi-arid regions as a strategy for adaptation to climate change, as part of the country's Author: Mekonnen Adnew Degefu, Mekonnen Adnew Degefu, Mohammed Assen, Poshendra Satyal, Jessica Budds.

The Determinants of Agricultural Productivity and Rural Household Income in Ethiopia Tessema Urgessa1 Abstract This paper aims at investigating the determinants of agricultural productivity and rural household income in Ethiopia.

Three econometric models namely: Pooled ordinary least square (P OLS), fixed effects (F E) and random effects. FAO Priorities in Ethiopia FAO’s Country Programming Framework (CPF ) sets out three government priority areas to guide our partnership with and support to the Government of Ethiopia, namely crop production and productivity, livestock and fisheries production and sustainable natural resources management.

In Food and Agriculture in Ethiopia: Progress and Policy Challenges, Paul Dorosh and Shahidur Rashid, along with other experts, tell the story of Ethiopia's political, economic, and agricultural transformation.

The book is designed to provide empirical evidence to shed light on the complexities of agricultural and food policy in today's. Commercial fruit production in Ethiopia is a young industry and is started in the last six decades.

There are very few commercial fruit orchards in the country and most of them are run by the state sectors. Prior to land nationalization individuals established many orchards. These orchards were given to farmers and state farms.

More specifically, the Ethiopian government perceived villagization as a way to hasten agricultural collectivization.

Most peasant farming in Ethiopia was still based on a traditional smallholding system, which produced 90 percent of farm output, employed about 80 percent of the labor force, and accounted for 94 percent of cultivable land in Ministry of Agriculture, PO BoxAddis Ababa, Ethiopia Abstract Farmers in Ethiopia commonly lose up to 40% of their crops because of weed infestations.

Because crops are not normally planted in rows, weeding is a time-consuming task, taking up to h/ha. Weeds are controlled mainly by hand weeding, but also by good agricultural. In this case study we have attempted to investigate the impact or effects of the villagization programme in Ethiopia.

The case study set out with three main objectives namely to identify and assess the impact of the villagization programme on: (a) agricultural activities, (b) homestead and housing conditions, and (c) access to services and infrastructure.

Home IFPRI Publications Food and agriculture in Ethiopia Reference URL Share. Add tags Comment Rate. Save to favorites. To link to this object, paste this link in email, IM or document To embed this object, paste this HTML in website.

Food and agriculture in Ethiopia. Agriculture dominates the Ethiopian economy, accounting for about 50 percent of its GDP and 82 percent of its employment. However, the sector has always performed poorly.

The largest proportion of farmers live below the poverty line and few and poorly provided social amenities are available in rural : Fantu Bachewe. In l the government initiated a new relocation program known as villagization.

The objectives of the program, which grouped scattered farming communities throughout the country into small village clusters, were to promote rational land use; conserve resources; provide access to clean water and to health and education services; and strengthen security.

World Development, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp.Printed in Great Britain. Food Production Strategy Debates in Revolutionary Ethiopia X/88 $ + Pergamon Press plc JOHN M. COHEN Harvard Institute for International Development, Cambridge, Massachusetts and NILS-IVAR ISAKSSON Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala by: Through extensive infrastructure construction and large-scale agricultural production, the government of Ethiopia seeks to reach middle-income status by A key element of the development strategy is the relocation of million people from areas targeted for industrial plantations under the government’s “villagization” program.Review on Role and Challenges of Agricultural Extension Service on Farm Productivity in Ethiopia Int.

J. Agric. Educ. Ext. Role of agricultural extension service on farm productivity A role may be defined as a set of norms, values and interaction patterns associated with Cited by: 1.